Diversity in Technology Fields – Mouse_California’s Role

Diversity ImageRecently, some of the largest technology companies in the world released diversity reports, revealing alarming gender and racial disparities in the tech workforce. On average, women account for only 30% of employees at Google, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Facebook, and Salesforce. That number drops to an average of less than 20% for technical and top-level management positions (PRandcompany.com 7/18/14). The lack of racial diversity in the Silicon Valley tech industry is even more pronounced, with more than 60% of employees being white, 30% Asian, 3% Hispanic/Latino, and 2% African-American (San Jose Mercury News 8/5/14).

MOUSE California provides a unique technology program that engages students – particularly those who are traditionally underrepresented in tech programs – with hands-on learning experiences that inspire them to pursue a future in technology. MOUSE’s Student Tech Leadership Program is currently found in over 135 schools throughout California, serving more than 4,000 students. Given the alarming lack of women and minorities found in today’s technology workforce, we strive to reach students in high-need school districts who may not otherwise have access to technology programs. Our efforts are paying off – Nearly 60% of our students are African-American or Hispanic/Latino, 60% are low-income and 40% are female.

To learn more about how MOUSE is addressing diversity in technology, read our White Paper. In addition, read our flyer to learn about how MOUSE is leading the way through education.

Diversity Statistics: Sources

  1. On average, women account for only 30% of employees at Google, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Facebook, and Salesforce. That number drops to an average of less than 20% for technical and top-level management positions. (PRandcompany.com 7/18/14)
  2. The lack of racial diversity in the Silicon Valley tech industry is even more pronounced, with more than 60% of employees being white, 30% Asian, 3% Hispanic/Latino, and 2% African-American (San Jose Mercury News 8/5/14).
  3. A first step toward addressing these disparities is increasing the number of women and minorities who pursue tech degrees. Women earned less than 20% of computer science and engineering undergraduate degrees in 2010. Underserved minorities earned less than 20% of computer science and roughly 12% of engineering degrees in 2010 (National Science Foundation, 2013).
  4. The ability to attract students to these degrees is limited by the lack of tech education available in public schools. Currently, 9 out of 10 K-12 schools in the U.S. do not offer computer science courses (Time Magazine 7/31/14).
  5. It is no surprise that close to 60% of students who begin high school interested in pursuing STEM change their minds by graduation. (U.S. News and World Report 1/31/13).